• The Impact of a Fracking Ban on Shale Production and the Economy by Michael Lynch

    Oil and gas production from the U.S. petroleum resource base has experienced an unprecedented expansion in output which has now positioned the U.S. as the world’s largest oil and gas producer. The North American petroleum production platform is soon to become a net oil and gas exporter to the world market. This rapid expansion in oil and gas production has enhanced U.S. energy security, provided greater stability to the world oil market, and conveyed sustained economic benefits to the national economy. The expansion in output has been possible through a series of advances in extraction technology including the use of hydraulic fracturing which permits oil and gas production from so-called source rock.

    Concerns over carbon emissions from sustained increases in domestic oil and gas production has now been reflected in the 2020 Presidential race, with some candidates and many public interest groups calling for an end to hydraulic fracturing. Operationally, these initiatives would include a ban on oil and gas development on public lands, prohibition of new infrastructure, such as pipelines, export terminals and even refineries. This effort, championed by several Democratic candidates for President would include features of so-called Green New Deal (GND) to quickly move that national energy complex to a fully renewable fuel system.

    In this paper, EPRINC fellow, Michael Lynch, explores the economic consequences of policies aimed at severely reducing U.S. oil and gas production. Such an estimate is important because whatever the merits (benefits) from reducing carbon emissions through oil and gas production constraints, policy makers will have to confront the costs and public acceptance of such a policy.

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  • The Hill Op-Ed Thumbnail

    The Homeland Threat to Affordable U.S. Energy

    Lucian Pugliaresi penned an Op Ed in The Hill on the pending legal action by local California governments claiming that U.S. oil companies have created a nuisance by knowingly causing harm to the future of human life and property.  He points out that missing from the list of defendants is the federal government which had an active and aggressive program, spanning Democrat and Republican, to promote and expand domestic oil and gas production. A copy of the Op Ed can be found here.

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  • Screen Shot 2018-06-01 at 11.40.00 AM

    The U.S. Renewable Fuel Standard Background, Controversies, & Reform, or, This Crisis, … or the Next?
    Offering a U.S. perspective at the Argus Global Gasoline Conference, EPRINC’s Max Pyziur gave a presentation on the RFS titled “An Overview of the Renewable Fuel Standard, Gasoline Blending Challenges And Pathways For Reform.” He also participated in a panel discussion on fuel quality and the potential to increase blends of ethanol, ETBE, and reformates. A copy of Max’s presentation and photos from the event can be found here.
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  • McQueen

    Trump Administration Decides to Revisit Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards
    Lucian Pugliaresi and Max Pyziur penned an Op Ed in the The Hill outlining their views on why the Mid Term Evaluation (MTE)  on the efficacy of CAFE should get a full review.  Although many commentators have viewed the Trump Administration’s decision to proceed with a  full review of CAFE as a regulatory roll back, the decision merely restores the original agreement to give the program a full review in 2017 before giving the green light on the more stringent standards through 2025.  A link to their Op Ed in The Hill  can be found here and an EPRINC version of the Op Ed can be found here.
    Read More
  • PCH

    Carbon Taxes on Transportation Fuels
    If excise and road  taxes were converted to carbon taxes how much would drivers be paying? Will Pack and Steven Lee have a short note estimating the implicit carbon tax already in place for transportation fuels.  Any program to impose carbon taxes will have to consider that some fuels are already paying taxes.  A copy of the EPRINC note can be found here.
    Read More
The Impact of a Fracking Ban on Shale Production and the Economy by Michael Lynch

Oil and gas production from the U.S. petroleum resource base has experienced an unprecedented expansion in output which has now positioned the U.S. as the world’s largest oil and gas producer. The North American petroleum production platform is soon to become a net oil and gas exporter to the world market. This rapid expansion in oil and gas production has enhanced U.S. energy security, provided greater stability to the world oil market, and conveyed sustained economic benefits to the national economy. The expansion in output has been possible through a series of advances in extraction technology including the use of hydraulic fracturing which permits oil and gas production from so-called source rock.

Concerns over carbon emissions from sustained increases in domestic oil and gas production has now been reflected in the 2020 Presidential race, with some candidates and many public interest groups calling for an end to hydraulic fracturing. Operationally, these initiatives would include a ban on oil and gas development on public lands, prohibition of new infrastructure, such as pipelines, export terminals and even refineries. This effort, championed by several Democratic candidates for President would include features of so-called Green New Deal (GND) to quickly move that national energy complex to a fully renewable fuel system.

In this paper, EPRINC fellow, Michael Lynch, explores the economic consequences of policies aimed at severely reducing U.S. oil and gas production. Such an estimate is important because whatever the merits (benefits) from reducing carbon emissions through oil and gas production constraints, policy makers will have to confront the costs and public acceptance of such a policy.

The Homeland Threat to Affordable U.S. Energy

Lucian Pugliaresi penned an Op Ed in The Hill on the pending legal action by local California governments claiming that U.S. oil companies have created a nuisance by knowingly causing harm to the future of human life and property.  He points out that missing from the list of defendants is the federal government which had an active and aggressive program, spanning Democrat and Republican, to promote and expand domestic oil and gas production. A copy of the Op Ed can be found here.

The Hill Op-Ed Thumbnail

The U.S. Renewable Fuel Standard Background, Controversies, & Reform, or, This Crisis, … or the Next?
Offering a U.S. perspective at the Argus Global Gasoline Conference, EPRINC’s Max Pyziur gave a presentation on the RFS titled “An Overview of the Renewable Fuel Standard, Gasoline Blending Challenges And Pathways For Reform.” He also participated in a panel discussion on fuel quality and the potential to increase blends of ethanol, ETBE, and reformates. A copy of Max’s presentation and photos from the event can be found here.

Screen Shot 2018-06-01 at 11.40.00 AM

Trump Administration Decides to Revisit Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards
Lucian Pugliaresi and Max Pyziur penned an Op Ed in the The Hill outlining their views on why the Mid Term Evaluation (MTE)  on the efficacy of CAFE should get a full review.  Although many commentators have viewed the Trump Administration’s decision to proceed with a  full review of CAFE as a regulatory roll back, the decision merely restores the original agreement to give the program a full review in 2017 before giving the green light on the more stringent standards through 2025.  A link to their Op Ed in The Hill  can be found here and an EPRINC version of the Op Ed can be found here.

McQueen

Carbon Taxes on Transportation Fuels
If excise and road  taxes were converted to carbon taxes how much would drivers be paying? Will Pack and Steven Lee have a short note estimating the implicit carbon tax already in place for transportation fuels.  Any program to impose carbon taxes will have to consider that some fuels are already paying taxes.  A copy of the EPRINC note can be found here.

PCH

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