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    EPRINC and IER Co-Host Virtual Workshop on “Understanding the Safer Affordable Fuel-Efficient (SAFE) Rule for Automobiles”

    On July 27, 2020, the Energy Policy Research Foundation and the Institute for Energy Research jointly hosted a virtual workshop on the recently adopted regulation setting fuel efficiency standards for passenger cars and light trucks. 

    Current and former officials from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA), representatives from the auto industry, EPRINC and IER staff, and a cross section of stakeholders discussed the new rule  and its broader implications for energy markets and the future of the U.S. auto industry. 

    The video recording of the workshop can be accessed here, and the presentation from Heidi King is here and the one from Max Pyziur is here.

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  • EPRINC’s Lucian Pugliaresi and Larry Goldstein Publish a Commentary on Policy Responses to the Current Crisis in the World Oil Market in Real Clear Energy

    EPRINC President Lucian Pugliaresi and former EPRINC President Larry Goldstein have written a piece for Real Clear Energy entitled “Oil Quotas and Import Fees? No, Get America Back to Work.” In this piece, they examine the current issues in petroleum in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, as demand destruction coincides with an oversupplied market. They write about their concerns with oil quotas and import fees as realistic solutions to this issue, and provide their thoughts on a possible solution. Click here to read their article.

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  • The Impact of a Fracking Ban on Shale Production and the Economy by Michael Lynch

    Oil and gas production from the U.S. petroleum resource base has experienced an unprecedented expansion in output which has now positioned the U.S. as the world’s largest oil and gas producer. The North American petroleum production platform is soon to become a net oil and gas exporter to the world market. This rapid expansion in oil and gas production has enhanced U.S. energy security, provided greater stability to the world oil market, and conveyed sustained economic benefits to the national economy. The expansion in output has been possible through a series of advances in extraction technology including the use of hydraulic fracturing which permits oil and gas production from so-called source rock.

    Concerns over carbon emissions from sustained increases in domestic oil and gas production has now been reflected in the 2020 Presidential race, with some candidates and many public interest groups calling for an end to hydraulic fracturing. Operationally, these initiatives would include a ban on oil and gas development on public lands, prohibition of new infrastructure, such as pipelines, export terminals and even refineries. This effort, championed by several Democratic candidates for President would include features of so-called Green New Deal (GND) to quickly move that national energy complex to a fully renewable fuel system.

    In this paper, EPRINC fellow, Michael Lynch, explores the economic consequences of policies aimed at severely reducing U.S. oil and gas production. Such an estimate is important because whatever the merits (benefits) from reducing carbon emissions through oil and gas production constraints, policy makers will have to confront the costs and public acceptance of such a policy.

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    The Homeland Threat to Affordable U.S. Energy

    Lucian Pugliaresi penned an Op Ed in The Hill on the pending legal action by local California governments claiming that U.S. oil companies have created a nuisance by knowingly causing harm to the future of human life and property.  He points out that missing from the list of defendants is the federal government which had an active and aggressive program, spanning Democrat and Republican, to promote and expand domestic oil and gas production. A copy of the Op Ed can be found here.

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    The U.S. Renewable Fuel Standard Background, Controversies, & Reform, or, This Crisis, … or the Next?
    Offering a U.S. perspective at the Argus Global Gasoline Conference, EPRINC’s Max Pyziur gave a presentation on the RFS titled “An Overview of the Renewable Fuel Standard, Gasoline Blending Challenges And Pathways For Reform.” He also participated in a panel discussion on fuel quality and the potential to increase blends of ethanol, ETBE, and reformates. A copy of Max’s presentation and photos from the event can be found here.
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EPRINC First Energy Security Series Virtual Workshop: Energy Security and the North American Oil & Gas Production Platform

EPRINC has hosted the first virtual workshop in its new Energy Security Series series, entitled “Energy Security and the North American Oil & Gas Production Platform.” The recording of the workshop available here.

Initiatives to limit U.S. oil and gas production can be expected in the near future. Are these policy initiatives effective measures to accelerate the energy transition and do they conflict with long-standing measures to sustain American energy security?  

EPRINC staff and fellows Ivan Sandrea, Jeff Kissel, Max Pyziur, Michael Lynch, Larry Goldstein, Carmine Difiglio, Glen Sweetnam, and Lucian Pugliaresi as well as Aaron Annabel from the Canadian Embassy, Trisha Curtis (EPRINC fellow, PetroNerds), and Fred Hutchison from LNG Allies provided presentations and commentary on this important topic. Their presentations can be found here. The agenda for the event can be found here.

Emily Medina on the Future of the U.S.-Mexico Energy Relationship

EPRINC Fellow Emily Medina has published another piece on Mexican public policy and energy economics. This paper, entitled “The U.S.-Mexico Energy Relationship Going Forward,” examines the future of the relationship between the two countries focusing on bilateral energy integration, Mexico’s new nationalist policies, and the incoming Biden administration while keeping the geopolitics of the world in mind. The paper can be found here.

The piece has been published by Mexico Today, an English-language news service by the newspaper Reforma.

IEEJ and EPRINC Co-Host Virtual Workshop: The Role Of LNG In A Carbon-Constrained Market

The Institute of Energy Economics Japan (IEEJ) and the Energy Policy Research Foundation, Inc. (EPRINC) jointly hosted a virtual workshop, “The Role of LNG in a Carbon-Constrained Market” on December 15, 2020, 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm (Washington, D.C. – EST); December 16, 2020, 9:00 am – 11:00 am (Tokyo – JST).

This workshop was part of an ongoing cooperative program between IEEJ and EPRINC to explore the potential for LNG to meet rising energy demand and growing requirements for decarbonization in Asian markets. Japanese and U.S. energy research experts, senior representatives from U.S. and Japanese companies, officials from the Japanese Ministry of Economics, Trade, and Industry, and others came together for a discussion on policy and technology developments needed to address the challenges and opportunities for LNG as Asia’s growing energy consuming centers search for efforts to restrain carbon emissions and sustain economic growth.

The workshop agenda can be found here. The workshop was recorded and is accessible at this link using passcode: ?#?@s8cS

There were some excellent presentations given at the workshop, which can be downloaded here. In addition, EPRINC’s Max Pyziur provided all participants with a scene-setting presentation that is accessible here.

Coal in the Asian Power Market IEEJ/EPRINC Virtual Workshop

The Institute of Energy Economics Japan (IEEJ) and the Energy Policy Research Foundation, Inc. (EPRINC) have jointly hosted a virtual workshop, “Coal in the Asian Power Market: A Discussion on the Potential for LNG and Decarbonization Technologies to Address Rising Carbon Emissions” on November 5, 2020.

This workshop was part of an ongoing cooperative program between IEEJ and EPRINC to explore the potential for LNG to meet rising energy demand and growing requirements for decarbonization in Asian markets.
 
This virtual workshop included presentations on future prospects for coal use in China, India, Japan, and other Asian countries. The workshop examined the potential for lowering carbon emissions through greater use of LNG and carbon capture technologies. Researchers from IEEJ, EPRINC, China, and industry executives participated in a timely discussion on this critical issue. The workshop was recorded is accessible here, (use passcode: +xn7.678). The agenda from the workshop is available here, and the presentations can be found here.

Lucian Pugliaresi Presents at Hellenic Association of Energy Economists

Lucian Pugliaresi participated in the annual symposium of the Hellenic Association of Energy Economists.  This year’s program examined energy transitions and the symposium was held in a virtual format from Athens, Greece between September 30 to October 2, 2020.  He presented recent EPRINC findings on proposals to prohibit the use of  hydraulic fracturing in producing oil and gas from unconventional reserves.  His presentation, The Curious Idea to Ban Hydraulic Fracturing in the U.S.  can be found here.

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