Mexico’s Role In Sustaining the North American Petroleum Renaissance

Non-resident fellow Emily Medina has produced a report on Mexico as part of the Energy Policy Research Foundation’s multi-year research program evaluating the scale and scope of the North American petroleum renaissance. As U.S. producers expand production to meet domestic requirements and the rapidly growing market for pipeline exports and Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), it is essential that policy makers have a full understanding of the sustainability of the U.S. natural gas production platform. The report covers the characteristics of the Mexican market for that natural gas as well as the challenges and opportunities that Mexico’s evolving energy sector faces as it reacts to current market trends. Emily’s report can be found here.

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The Homeland Threat to Affordable U.S. Energy

Lucian Pugliaresi penned an Op Ed in The Hill on the pending legal action by local California governments claiming that U.S. oil companies have created a nuisance by knowingly causing harm to the future of human life and property.  He points out that missing from the list of defendants is the federal government which had an active and aggressive program, spanning Democrat and Republican, to promote and expand domestic oil and gas production. A copy of the Op Ed can be found here.

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EPRINC Welcomes Emily Medina as a non-resident Fellow

EPRINC is happy to welcome Emily Medina as a non-resident fellow at EPRINC as we expand our research and outreach programs on U.S.-Mexican energy developments.  Born and raised in Mexico, she has experience working with both the private and public sectors on important energy matters. More on Emily’s experience can be found here.

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Hedging Haircuts and Big Basis Moves

EPRINC trustee Ben Montalbano and non-Resident Fellow Trisha Curtis, both co-founders of PetroNerds, have just completed an assessment of oil hedging positions of 25 major oil producers in the Permian Basin.  Hedging is a valuable tool for distributing risk and allowing producers to protect revenue streams from price volatility. Hedges protect producers revenues when oil prices fall, but also limit gains when prices rise.  In addition, when oil prices rise it may limit the supply response if a large volume of unconventional production is hedged. Ben and Trisha’s assessment shows the percent of total production that producers hedge varies, but heading into Q1of 2018 producers hedged about 20% of total output. A copy of their assessment can be found here.

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